RESOLUTION REVOLUTION

What will 2017 teach you?

By Dani Greening, Artworker & Copywriter


As December sets and the new year peaks onto the horizon, companies and employees alike will be reflecting on the past 12 months, from the exciting highs to the dreary lows. They will also be looking ahead to 2017 and trying to predict what changes will lie ahead in the new year.
 

"So what changes can we see in 2017 in Learning and Development and how can we prepare for these?"


Key Trends for 2017

Bersin’s research study ‘Invisible, Contextual & Systematic’ explores how organisations are changing and considering the needs of the modern learner more in 2017.

Some key trends are invisible learning and development, where organisations are moving away from content creation, facilitation and delivery and focusing more on enabling learning or performance improvement wherever and whenever it occurs in the organisation.

So will this be a driver in how organisations approach employee development? Can employee development play a role in how committed and engaged a worker is?
 

The new year brings with it the scope to better yourself from both a personal and professional level.

So now is the time to evaluate your performance:

What have you achieved?

Did you step outside of your comfort zone?

What have you learned?

Will you focus on self-building or team building?

How will you develop yourself and build upon your skill set?


We’ve asked ourselves the same questions and on reflection, we’ve been on quite a journey and reached many milestones. We’ve had a busy year and have evolved our personal learning and development as a result. After measuring our success, we feel ready to go into the new year with resolutions that are achievable and meaningful to us as a business, and most importantly to us as employees.
 

"So how can we set our new year’s resolutions and make them stick?"


Findings confirm that only 8% of those who try and stick to their new year’s resolution are lasting. Of those who are prosperous, 39% are in their twenties, and 14% are over 50. Whilst there are some rare cases whereby resolutions are kept for life, 75% are only maintained within the first week.

But that doesn’t mean that these resolutions should be abandoned before they even have the chance to come to light. For professionals, resolutions should be based on what you have achieved. For instance, did you create new leads and collaborate with any new clients? Did any of your work win you awards? By measuring the success of what went well, you should then be able to plan the year ahead of you more efficiently.

However, success shouldn’t be the only element you evaluate. Failure is also essential when trying to determine how to better yourself, regardless of how it has been stigmatised.

Failing to accomplish something isn’t a sign of weakness, but an opportunity to learn and evolve.

If you are managing a team, it would be beneficial to hold regular interventions for learning and development.

This would turn leaders into thinkers, and would bring out the best results within people.

 

Monitoring and measuring performance is key

Pushing the message of improvement to your employees sets a benchmark for what is expected from your staff.

From a personal level, do you need to focus on being more organised in order to increase work productivity? Learn to archive emails, delete spam, create folders to allow a more fluent workflow. It’s simple yet effective moves like this that make a dramatic impact in bettering yourself.

As well as creating your resolutions and plans for next year, it’s also vital to take time out to celebrate your successes. After a year of hard work, congratulate one another on all that you have achieved. December is the perfect time to do this with office parties and festive nights out. It’s celebrations like these that heighten employee morale, and bring your team closer together as a unit.

By measuring and understanding your strengths and unique attributes, you can maximise on what sets you apart from everyone else. And what better time to do this than now.
 

"A new year, a new perspective, a new attitude, and a new and improved you."